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Let There Be Light: Four Tips for Boosting Productivity at the Office

Guest blog by Angelo DiGangi

Remember those bulky, flickering tube lights that adorned the ceiling of your elementary school? The distracting hum? The intense glow bearing down? Alas, these eerie fixtures didn’t exactly create the ambience for long division mastery!

The truth is, proper lighting is crucial for workplace efficiency. Ineffective lighting can lead to poor morale, eye stress and fatigue. Finding the right balance, however, can be tricky – there are many subtle factors to take into account. Fortunately, a little know-how can go a long way.

When addressing the lighting in your place of business, always keep your task in mind – what works for some might not work for all. That being said, consider these useful tips for jumpstarting energy levels and encouraging productivity in the workplace.

1. Keep it consistent
Ever gone from a hazy, dimly-lit cocktail lounge to a bright, colorful frozen yogurt shop? Well, it’s just plain confusing – both for your body and for your emotional state! Studies suggest that abrupt changes in lighting can increase fatigue. Thus, keeping the lighting balanced throughout the workplace is crucial for maintaining consistent energy levels. Overhead fixtures, as well as lamps situated at varying levels, can help keep ensure an even distribution of light.

2. Avoid direct glare
Direct glare – from lamps, overhead fixtures, or natural sunlight – is known to cause lethargy. In order to avoid that dreary brain fog, look for ways to diffuse the light emitted from bright lamps and sunshine. Consider using a larger number of low-brightness fixtures to keep it mellow. Light-colored curtains or blinds on windows – along with shades for lamps and covers for overhead fixtures – can help spread the light evenly, without blocking it. Glare-controlling baffles and lenses, when attached to a fixture, do a great job diffusing direct rays.

3. Out with the old and in with the new
If you haven’t heard the hype, it’s time to ditch those old incandescent light bulbs and out-of-date fluorescents! While CFL (compact fluorescent) technology has improved tremendously in recent years, consider making the switch to LED (light emitting diode) bulbs. In addition to being more energy-efficient, reliable and safe, LEDs give off a softer light more suited to natural productivity. Depending on the size of your business, however, overhead fluorescent fixtures might be more suited for the job.

When investing in new light bulbs and fixtures, pay attention to the Color Rendering Index. Our vision systems shift to overdrive when confronted with poor color rendering – thus draining our energy and causing weariness. This quantitative scale shows the extent to which a light source retains natural color. Sunlight, for example, scores a 100 on the Color Rendering Index. Which leads us to our final tip…

4. Utilize natural light
That’s right: no light source holds a candle to good old-fashioned sunlight. Research consistently shows that natural light keeps us energetic and alert. That being said, do be careful of direct rays – this can have the adverse effect! When properly trapped and diffused, however, a little sunlight can work wonders on office morale.

If images of buzzing, alien-esque tubes dangling from the ceiling of your third-grade classroom still haunt you in your sleep, it’s time to listen to your dreams. After all, it’s not your fault you never learned the difference between a subject and a predicate – it was those obnoxious lights!

When considering ways to maximize energy levels and boost productivity around the office, never underestimate the power of quality lighting. A few simple changes can make all the difference.

Angelo DiGangi is a Home Depot on-the-floor store associate in the Chicago area, and a regular contributor on electrical topics for Home Depot’s website.

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